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Posts Tagged ‘performance art’

The Double_place des arts_49

The Double_place des arts_45

The Double_place des arts_1

The Double_place des arts_65

45 minutes at place-des-art, Montreal, Feb 7, 2014, Photo by Parham Yazdy

Performed by Laurence Eulalle, Stephanie Wu, Maggy Flynn, Veronique Morier, Mary Williamson, Brittney Gering, Bailey Eng, Ekaterina Kukharchuk, Lucy Fandel, Camille Brisson, Liliana Argumedo, Mira Fister-Tadic, Wing Sze Tsang-Hy, Alida Esmail, Natalie Montalvo.

Sixteen females wear red mouthpieces and white bath towels, standing in a row and facing the same direction. They repeat four still gestures: standing, kneeing, sitting, and lying on the floor. The performers hold each gesture for five minutes and then move to another gesture.

The gestures in the performance are inspired by gargoyle, a legendary stone-carved grotesque with a spout that normally is designed to convey water from a roof. Mouth serves as the opening for food intake and in the articulation of sound and speech. However, when performers wear the mouthpieces, or when women’s mouth is forced to open, the mouth loses its function. In fact, it silences and disables the women because they are unable to talk when their mouths are widely pulled open. This performance explores another side of the unseen and unspoken—the vulnerability, struggle, shame, and suffering that we are uneasy to share and expose.

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong wear a military suit and red underwear, kneeling on a washboard and keeping straight and still as long as she can in Venice Biennale in 2013Chun Hua Catherine Dong wear a military suit and red underwear, kneeling on a washboard and keeping straight and still as long as she can in Venice Biennale in 2013Chun Hua Catherine Dong wear a military suit and red underwear, kneeling on a washboard and keeping straight and still as long as she can in Venice Biennale in 2013Chun Hua Catherine Dong wear a military suit and red underwear, kneeling on a washboard and keeping straight and still as long as she can in Venice Biennale in 2013Chun Hua Catherine Dong wear a military suit and red underwear, kneeling on a washboard and keeping straight and still as long as she can in Venice Biennale in 2013Chun Hua Catherine Dong wear a military suit and red underwear, kneeling on a washboard and keeping straight and still as long as she can in Venice Biennale in 20133 days at Infr’ Action Venezia Performance Festival,  Venice, May 28- June 1, 2013

I wear a military suit and a red underwear, kneeling on a washboard and keeping straight and still as long as I can. This performance explores vulnerability in ritualistic humiliation in performance through reconfiguring historical iconic image of the Red Guard in the Chinese Cultural Revolution.

The Chinese Cultural Revolution is a social-political movement that took place in the China from 1966 to 1976. The Red Guard is a specific group of high school and university students, formed under the Chinese Communist Party, who dedicated themselves to the wheel of the Revolution. They abandoned their studies and schools, marched across China in a campaign to eradicate the “ Four Olds” of society: the old ideas, cultures, manners, and customs. However, these attacks on culture quickly descended into attacks on people. These young revolutionary rebels caused havoc, resulting in great destruction and considerable loss of life. In some degree, they were victims and murders at the same time.

It is tragedy that neither the government nor Red Guards apologize to the victims in the Revolution. It seems that it was a period that many would prefer to forget. Maybe the only way for China to recover its humanity is to re-examine the Cultural Revolution and the Red Guard phenomenon. In my performance, the humiliation is used as a method of interrogation to seek altered states of consciousness that probably leads to salvation. It aims to add a voice in this re-examination of history within a performance art context that possibly opens more questions and discussions, most importantly, to seek justice and justification.

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong shot herself with ink at St Mark's Basilica in Venice Biennale 2013Chun Hua Catherine Dong shot herself with ink at St Mark's Basilica in Venice Biennale 2013The-Lost-Twelve-Years-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-02The-Lost-Twelve-Years-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-06The-Lost-Twelve-Years-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-04The-Lost-Twelve-Years-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-08

2o minutes at St Mark’s Basilica, May31, 2013, Infr’ Action Venezia Performance Festival

I kneel on a piece of traditional Chinese Ink Wash Painting without clothing, holding a water gun in my right hand. The gun is filled with black ink. I lift the gun, point to my head and shoot. And then I lift the gun again, this time, I point to my heart and shoot. The action of shooting at my head and heart will be repeated until the ink on the water gun runs out.

After living aboard as a Chinese for 12 years, I noticed there is a tremendous change inside me: something that has nurtured and cultivated me has gradually faded and forgotten. The gesture of shooting myself with ink is a political gesture. It is not only an apology for my twelve-year absence but also a manifestation that reveals my urgent needs to renew my lost tradition and culture. The ink is an essential material for Chinese traditional painting and calligraphy. In my performance, the ink is not to be used as an artistic tool to reproduce the appearance of the subject, but to be used as a weapon against myself. this performance examines relationships between me and the place I live, between what I have lost and what I have gained. This performance is also a ritual meditation. In this suicidal ritual, I baptize myself with Chinese ink in order to be saved from fear of loss, preserve my identity from the process of self-transformation, and to capture my stray soul in a foreign land.

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. Chun Hua Catherine Dong is laying on the floor like a hopeless babyChun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. Chun Hua Catherine Dong is sitting on her parents' back like a ghost childChun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. Chun Hua Catherine Dong is sitting on her father's lap like a giant unhappy babyChun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. Chun Hua Catherine Dong is fed by her fatherRed-Baby-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-06Red-Baby-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-01Chun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. the red baby is having bedtime story

Red Baby consists of 30 staged photographs depicting a family of mixed race parents and a child. I painted my body red, wearing a diaper and fake mouthpiece, and I lived with strangers hired from Craigslist for eight hours in a red room, as their child. They were asked to feed me, play with me, pamper and take care of me. In this work, the “red baby” is a symbol for contemporary China, caught between east and west. The baby, symbolic of both communist and capitalist influences, is also a future model for social transformation, imagining a new utopia.

photo by Dayna Danger, performed by Wing Sze Tsang-Hy, Peter Meritzis

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong invited a ballerina, a dominatrix, and a monk to improvise a performance at a gallery opening in Montreal. The Ballerina is dancing and an audience might have a thought in his mindChun Hua Catherine Dong invited a ballerina, a dominatrix, and a monk to improvise a performance at an exhibition opening in Montreal. All performers are bowing to the dominatrixSymbiosis-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-11Chun Hua Catherine Dong invited a ballerina, a dominatrix, and a monk to improvise a performance at an exhibition opening in Montreal. the ballerina is dancing while the monk is meditatingChun Hua Catherine Dong invited a ballerina, a dominatrix, and a monk to improvise a performance at an exhibition opening in Montreal. the dominatrix is putting needles on the dominated girl's arm

 

Two hours at Art Mur, Montreal, 2013
I invited A professional ballerina, a dominatrix who has over 25 year experiences in Montreal BDSM scene, and a monk (performed by an performance artist), to an exhibition opening to improvise a show without any rehearsal. The only instruction I gave to them is to try to engage with each other around every 10 minutes.
A performance blurs boundaries between high art and low art, religion and fetish, private and public, striving to install a model for social transformation that possibly could create a new way to look at utopia.
performed by Paula Duffy, Vikou Qi’anne, and Mistress Sugah, and cyranova, photo by Eric Tschaeppeler

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong explores mistranslations and metaphrase in language by reenacting English idiom Cry Over Split MilkChun Hua Catherine Dong explores mistranslations and metaphrase in language by reenacting English idiomChips on ShoulderChun Hua Catherine Dong explores mistranslations and metaphrase in language by reenacting English idiom A Drop in the BucketChun Hua Catherine Dong explores mistranslations and metaphrase in language by reenacting English idiom Beat a Dead HorseSeven-Idiomatic-Pieces-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-03Seven-Idiomatic-Pieces-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-07Seven-Idiomatic-Pieces-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-01


12 hours at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada, November 2012

“Seven Idiomatic Pieces” is a performance series that . Although idioms might not make sense for many non-English speakers, I found out that they are like ready-made scripts that can be performed. For instance, the idiom, “the apple of my eye,” consists of two elements: apple and eye. However, what interests me most is how to use the two elements that seemingly have no connections to each other to make a performance in order to convey meanings or emotions. “Seven Idiomatic Pieces” focuses on the surface of the language and translates idioms into performative actions and gestures.

performed by Tran Chovic, photo and video by Shannon Harris.

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong uses her body to play a couple in domestic lives: she wears the husband’s clothing to present his presence. wife is left and husband is right.Absend-Husband-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-04Chun Hua Catherine Dong uses her body to play a couple in domestic lives: she wears the husband’s clothing to present his presence. wife is left and husband is right.Absend-Husband-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-02Absend-Husband-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-05Absend-Husband-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-06

70” x80”, Ink jet prints

Absent Husband is a performance that consists 12 pieces of 70’’ x 40” photographs. Absence is a form of presence. The series of photographs is divided into diptychs acting as mirrors in which the absence of the other is reflected as a form of presence. This work tells stories of failure in romantic relationship through symbolism, gesture, and language. In this work, I use my body to play a couple in domestic lives: I wear the husband’s clothing to present his presence. The wife is on the left, and the husband is on the right. This division also physically enacts the separation of the couple. The body in this work is not only an interface that functions as a communicative vessel, but also a deeply felt expression of subjective reality. This work transcends personal experience and reality. It is an embodiment of a melancholic longing for an unrecoverable past and a memento mori as a constant reminder of the inexorable passage of time.

photo credit: Phoebe Jin

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