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Posts Tagged ‘body’

Chun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. Chun Hua Catherine Dong is laying on the floor like a hopeless babyChun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. Chun Hua Catherine Dong is sitting on her parents' back like a ghost childChun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. Chun Hua Catherine Dong is sitting on her father's lap like a giant unhappy babyChun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. Chun Hua Catherine Dong is fed by her fatherRed-Baby-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-06Red-Baby-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-01Chun Hua Catherine Dong painted her body red and wore diaper, living with strangers hired from Craigslist in a red room as their child. the red baby is having bedtime story

Red Baby consists of 30 staged photographs depicting a family of mixed race parents and a child. I painted my body red, wearing a diaper and fake mouthpiece, and I lived with strangers hired from Craigslist for eight hours in a red room, as their child. They were asked to feed me, play with me, pamper and take care of me. In this work, the “red baby” is a symbol for contemporary China, caught between east and west. The baby, symbolic of both communist and capitalist influences, is also a future model for social transformation, imagining a new utopia.

photo by Dayna Danger, performed by Wing Sze Tsang-Hy, Peter Meritzis

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong invited a ballerina, a dominatrix, and a monk to improvise a performance at a gallery opening in Montreal. The Ballerina is dancing and an audience might have a thought in his mindChun Hua Catherine Dong invited a ballerina, a dominatrix, and a monk to improvise a performance at an exhibition opening in Montreal. All performers are bowing to the dominatrixSymbiosis-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-11Chun Hua Catherine Dong invited a ballerina, a dominatrix, and a monk to improvise a performance at an exhibition opening in Montreal. the ballerina is dancing while the monk is meditatingChun Hua Catherine Dong invited a ballerina, a dominatrix, and a monk to improvise a performance at an exhibition opening in Montreal. the dominatrix is putting needles on the dominated girl's arm

 

Two hours at Art Mur, Montreal, 2013
I invited A professional ballerina, a dominatrix who has over 25 year experiences in Montreal BDSM scene, and a monk (performed by an performance artist), to an exhibition opening to improvise a show without any rehearsal. The only instruction I gave to them is to try to engage with each other around every 10 minutes.
A performance blurs boundaries between high art and low art, religion and fetish, private and public, striving to install a model for social transformation that possibly could create a new way to look at utopia.
performed by Paula Duffy, Vikou Qi’anne, and Mistress Sugah, and cyranova, photo by Eric Tschaeppeler

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong uses her body to play a couple in domestic lives: she wears the husband’s clothing to present his presence. wife is left and husband is right.Absend-Husband-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-04Chun Hua Catherine Dong uses her body to play a couple in domestic lives: she wears the husband’s clothing to present his presence. wife is left and husband is right.Absend-Husband-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-02Absend-Husband-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-05Absend-Husband-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-06

70” x80”, Ink jet prints

Absent Husband is a performance that consists 12 pieces of 70’’ x 40” photographs. Absence is a form of presence. The series of photographs is divided into diptychs acting as mirrors in which the absence of the other is reflected as a form of presence. This work tells stories of failure in romantic relationship through symbolism, gesture, and language. In this work, I use my body to play a couple in domestic lives: I wear the husband’s clothing to present his presence. The wife is on the left, and the husband is on the right. This division also physically enacts the separation of the couple. The body in this work is not only an interface that functions as a communicative vessel, but also a deeply felt expression of subjective reality. This work transcends personal experience and reality. It is an embodiment of a melancholic longing for an unrecoverable past and a memento mori as a constant reminder of the inexorable passage of time.

photo credit: Phoebe Jin

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong's work, Husbands and I installation at Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery in 2012. She covered all of her photographs with red fabric, viewers has to lift up the curtains and see the photographsChun Hua Catherine Dong's work, Husbands and I installation at Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery in 2012. She covered all of her photographs with red fabric, viewers has to lift up the curtains and see her husbandsChun Hua Catherine Dong's work, Husbands and I installation, at Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery in 2012. Chun Hua Catherine Dong also stayed on her bed in the gallery for 60 hours to invite audiences to come to her bed to sleep with her or chatChun Hua Catherine Dong's work, Husbands and I installation, at Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery in 2012. Chun Hua Catherine Dong also stayed on her bed in the gallery for 60 hours to invite audiences to come to her bed to sleep with her or chatan audience came to Chun Hua Catherine Dong's bed and chatted with her when she stayed on her bed for 60 hours as part of her Husbands and I exhbition at Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery in 2012Husbands-and-I-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-13Chun Hua Catherine Dong's work, Husbands and I installation, at Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery in 2012. Chun Hua Catherine Dong covered all of her photographs with red fabric, viewers has to lift up the curtains and see the photographs

performance: 60 hours, May 17-June 2, 2012, in The  Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery

installation: video, digital prints, curtains, photo albums, bed, side tables, lamps and body

during the exhibition, i lay on a bed 60 hours in the gallery, inviting audience to come to my bed to chat and sleep with me.

I started the Husbands and I performance in 2009; I wore my Chinese traditional dress, walking on streets in Vancouver and asking white males to have photo taken with me by suggesting them to be my husband for a minute. I have had photo with 325 men. In September 2010, I advertised myself in various media as “an exotic, compliant and artistic Asian girl, looking for a white husband who would like to take me to his home and live with him for a day as his mail order bride.” I lived with men who responded my advertise a day. This performance ended in June 2011.

I emigrated from China to Canada several years ago. I regard the whole process of immigration as a marriage, and myself is like a mail order bride. I married Canada that I had never seen before, suddenly transforming myself from a Chinese to a Chinese Canadian or Canadian. My identity is not constructed by Canadian history, its culture or its beautiful landscapes, but the white males who are beside me.  The physical encounter between me and the white males actually is an ideological confrontation between me and the Western social and political landscape that I live in but don’t belong to. The process looking for a white man is a process of looking for home. However, unfortunately, the home is temporary and the relationship is ephemeral. Nevertheless, by exploring intimacy with them, I try to not only reconfigure the established centred power that the privileged white males embody, but also question whether the culturally interpreted Chinese female body, both as a foreign subject and object, can be invested and exploited, most importantly, question whether the concept of the borders still exists although physical borderline is crossed.

In an era of globalization and transnational migration, contact between cultures has given rise to pluralized and hybrid cultures. While celebrating and embracing this cultural hybridity, as an Asian Canadian, I have turned my attention to racialized individuals and minority groups, especially Asian women living in North America. Even though the world is constantly changing, the representation of Asian women doesn’t seem to change much in context of Western culture. In fact, the experience of the Asian women as enmeshed, to different degrees, with pre-existing visual representations of Orientalism and stereotyping is still normalized in modern Western culture. This situation results in a state of doubled oppression for Asian women—there is oppression both from within their own cultural communities, and oppression from external expectations relating to women of colour. This double oppression demands a performative cultural expression of racialized people according to both external and internal pressures, often resulting in a metaphorical silencing of the unique individual.

Wearing a Chinese traditional dress and acting as stereotype of an Asian woman in Western fascination might be regarded as self-essentialization, which conveys negative implication. However, this self-essentialization is not a self-generalization or self- generalizing my own Chinese essential attributes, but a self-consciousness of collectivity which is thinking the essence of my groups with awareness of the social relations and my own situation. As a result, it is a strategy. As a strategy, this self-essentialization is a political choice, a choice of deliberately acting out on culture. It is a social performance, a performance that creates a culture of resistance because in doing so the resistances can be recognized.

 

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In Chun Hua Catherine Dong's performance: Sixteen girls wear red mouthpieces and white bath towels, standing in a row, repeating three still gestures: standing, kneeing, and lying on the floor.In Chun Hua Catherine Dong's performance: Sixteen girls wear red mouthpieces and white bath towels, standing in a row, repeating three still gestures: standing, kneeing, and lying on the floor.The-Double-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-06The-Double-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-07In Chun Hua Catherine Dong's performance: Sixteen girls wear red mouthpieces and white bath towels, standing in a row, repeating  three still gestures: standing, kneeing, and lying on the floor.In Chun Hua Catherine Dong's performance: Sixteen girls wear red mouthpieces and white bath towels, standing in a row, repeating  three still gestures: standing, kneeing, and lying on the floor.

Performance: 2 hours at  Ancienne Ecole Des Beaux-Arts, Montreal, Mar 23, 2012

Sixteen females wear red mouthpieces and white bath towels, standing in a row and facing the same direction. They repeat three still gestures: standing, kneeing, and lying on the floor. The performers hold each gesture for five minutes and then move to another gesture.

Mouth serves as the opening for food intake and in the articulation of sound and speech. However, when performers wear the mouthpieces, or when women’s mouth is forced to open, the mouth loses its function. In fact, it silences and disables the women because they are unable to talk when their mouths are widely pulled open. This performance explores another side of the unseen and unspoken—the vulnerability, shame, and struggle that we are uneasy to share and expose.

performers: Alida Esmail, Karoline Lebrun, Emily Schon, Kendall Savage, Eliane Abdellahi, Paula Duffy, Danielle Doiron, Emilia Gallo, Janaki Banting, Elisabeth Racine, Anna Mayberry, Zoe Roux, Emilie L-Choquette, Alexandra Cote,  Allie Blumas, Maude Thibault Morin, Claire Evans, Lili Monette-Crepo, Alexandra Cote, Katrina B.

photo by: David Romero, Video by: Pirouz Nemati

 

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong leaks rice from her bag while having conversation withe people in a gallery in Vancouver. She stops leaking rice when their conversation is over.

Chun Hua Catherine Dong leaks rice from her bag while having conversation withe people in a gallery in Vancouver. She stops leaking rice when their conversation is over.Chun Hua Catherine Dong leaks rice from her bag while having conversation withe people in a gallery in Vancouver. She stops leaking rice when their conversation is over.Chun Hua Catherine Dong leaks rice from her bag while having conversation withe people in a gallery in Vancouver. She stops leaking rice when their conversation is over.

3 hours at  Nomad Art Gallery, Vancouver, 2010

i carry a bag with rice, walking in a gallery and approaching an audience to have a conversation. when the conversation starts, the rice leaks from my bag. when the conversation is over, the rice stops leaking. And then i move to another audience, the action repeats.

photo credit: Bitshere

 

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong demonstrated how to clean vagina with read-made and home-made tools, and invited audiences to clean her vagina in VancoouverChun Hua Catherine Dong demonstrated how to clean vagina with read-made and home-made tools, and invited audiences to clean her vagina in VancoouverChun Hua Catherine Dong demonstrated how to clean vagina with read-made and home-made tools, and invited audiences to clean her vagina in VancoouverChun Hua Catherine Dong demonstrated how to clean vagina with read-made and home-made tools, and invited audiences to clean her vagina in VancoouverCleaning-Interior-Scroll-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-11

45minutes at Yactac, Vancouver, 2010

i set a workshop space at Yactac. i sit on a table,  demonstrating how to clean vagina walls with ready-made and home-made tools, and then invite audiences to come to clean my vagina walls.

photo credit: Janice Cheung and Bitshere

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