Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for June, 2010

Chun Hua Catherine Dong asks strangers on streets to be her husbands for a minute, this man wearing green T-Shirt is one of her one-minute husbandsChun Hua Catherine Dong asks strangers on streets to be her husbands for a minute. She and her one-minute husband take photo together to capture their special moment

Chun Hua Catherine Dong asks strangers on streets to be her husbands for a minute. They took a picture together, sh and her one-minute husband are like a real coupleChun Hua Catherine Dong asks strangers on streets to be her husbands for a minute. She and her one-minute husband take photo together to capture their special momentChun Hua Catherine Dong asks strangers on streets to be her husbands for a minute. She and her one-minute husband take photo together to capture their special momentChun Hua Catherine Dong asks strangers on streets to be her husbands for a minute. They took a picture together, sh and her one-minute husband are like a real couple and lover

from a 325 husband collection

I started the Husbands and I performance in 2009; I wore my Chinese traditional dress, walking on streets in Vancouver and asking white males to have photo taken with me by suggesting them to be my husband for a minute. I have had photo with 325 men. In September 2010, I advertised myself in various media as “an exotic, compliant and artistic Asian girl, looking for a white husband who would like to take me to his home and live with him for a day as his mail order bride.” I lived with men who responded my advertise a day. This performance ended in June 2011.

I emigrated from China to Canada eight years ago. I regard the whole process of immigration as a marriage, and myself is like a mail order bride. I married Canada that I had never seen before, suddenly transforming myself from a Chinese to a Chinese Canadian or Canadian. My identity is not constructed by Canadian history, its culture or its beautiful landscapes, but the white males who are beside me.  The physical encounter between me and the white males actually is an ideological confrontation between me and the Western social and political landscape that I feel I don’t belong to. The process looking for a white man is a process of looking for home. However, unfortunately, the home is temporary and the relationship is ephemeral. Nevertheless, by exploring intimacy with them, I try to not only reconfigure the established centred power that the privileged white males embody, but also question whether the culturally interpreted Chinese female body, both as a foreign subject and object, can be invested and exploited, most importantly, question whether the concept of the borders still exists although physical borderline is crossed.

photo credit: Ruth Skinner

 

Read Full Post »

 

Chun Hua Catherine Dong chews up rice, splits it on a spoon and feed a male mannequin head at Western Front VancouverChun Hua Catherine Dong says translating a text is like chewing up rice and then feeding it to somebody else Chun Hua Catherine Dong eats her rice while a mannequin head is watching her, she feeds the mannequin head some pre-masticated rice for hours in Vancouver The-Other-Word-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-05Chun Hua Catherine Dong is feeding pre-masticated rice to a mannequin head, she eats rice, spits it to a spoon and feeds the manequin for fours hours

photo by James Zhang

four hours at Western Front Gallery

I set a desk and two chairs in a gallery space. I sit on a chair, and a male mannequin in front of me. There is a big bowl of cooked rice on the desk, I use a spoon to scoop rice, put it into my month, and slowly chew it until it becomes soft and warm. And then I carefully transfer the rice from my month to the spoon, and feed it to mannequin. This process is repeated until the rice on the plate is thoroughly transferred.

This performance refers that the sense of authenticity, integrity and beauty of resource language get lost in translation. The rice in this performance is a metaphor of text. I am sitting on a desk, translating a big plate of text to my reader who is devouring this plate in its translated form. My reader may understand the subject, but the quality of what he has consumed is definitely not the same as the original once. In fact, translating a text is like chewing up rice and then feeding it to somebody else. In performance, what I feed to the mannequin is still rice. However, this transformed rice has already lost its flavor and nutrition. It is the same in translation, clarity and fluency of source text might still be kept in a target text. However, the source text and the target text can never be the same because fidelity in translation is the root that translators strive to approach but it can never truly be reached.

Read Full Post »