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Archive for April, 2010

Chun Hua Catherine Dong keeps silent when audience uses a boom pole to pokes her, but her dress makes sharp soundChun Hua Catherine Dong stands on a plinth and doesn't speak when audience pokes herChun Hua Catherine Dong calls herself a silent participant, she holds her fist, looks at audience who pokes her with angry looks in her eyes

Chun Hua Catherine Dong doesn't care when audience makes fun of her, she looks away

This work  explores interactive wearable art.  three distance sensors are carefully embedded in flowers  on my dress. A lilypad arduino, a speaker, and batteries are  hidden on the back of the fan I hold . when the viewers use a boom microphone to closely examine the body to search signal, sharp sounds will occur.

The body is an interface. It is not only a site of intercultural encounter, but also a field of intersection of material and symbolic forces. This work doesn’t address much functionality but emotions, memory, fantasy and experience with awareness of body as intimate communicator and symbolic interface. It focuses more on viewers’ experiences: what is sensed, and what cognitive; and aesthetic processes are provoked during the interactive performance.

Silence is a sound that needs to be heard. Silence is meditation that needs to be read, a Ding, a sound to catch attention, a way of making things public, bringing light to shadow and stimulating public reflection and debate about the key issues of our time. Silence is also the intervention of crowd that needs to be seen. Silent doesn’t mean voiceless; if we don’t speak out, it doesn’t mean we don’t care.

Silent Participant is a term that I used to describe Asians living in the West who are often accused of having no opinions, of being indifferent to any politics, and of often sticking in their own ethnic groups. The silent participants are groups of visible minorities, often invisible but needing to be understood.

photo courtesy of artist
Chun Hua Catherine Dong®2010

 

 

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Chun Hua Catherine Dong pushes a big gallery wall during 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, the woman wearing red is watching herChun Hua Catherine Dong pushes a giant gallery wall during 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver to make comments about the BC government’s funding cuts to the artsAbsence-and-Presence-Chun-Hua-Catherine-Dong-08Chun Hua Catherine Dong pushes a big gallery wall during 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, she questions the relationship between artists and galleriesChun Hua Catherine Dong pushes a giant gallery wall during 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver to make comments about the BC government’s funding cuts to the arts

28 hours in Vancouver, 2010

I FEEL HOMELESS IN YOUR PRESENCE

I WILL BE AT HOME IN YOUR ABSENCE

On the CODElive opening during the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, I started to push a 12′x 8′x 42″gallery wall along streets of Granville Island. This movable wall is painted in white with 4 hidden wheels. On the wall, printed so as to be unremarkable except by flash photography, is the title of an exhibition: “I feel homeless in your presence/I will be at home in your absence”

This performance is a response to the BC government’s funding cuts to the arts. As a result of massive funding cuts, many galleries have been forced to close, and art is losing its home in B.C. The gallery wall, once a space of opportunity for artists, has had to be moved outside. This performance represents this sense of loss.

This hardship not only results in a tremendous loss to the arts in BC arts, but also raises more questions for artists. Can art survive without walls? Do we artists really need a gallery? The wall sometimes does not facilitate art but acts as an obstacle to divide art and artists. What if we artists try to push the gallery wall to the outside voluntarily, rather than being forced to move out because of politics? What if we artists try to move this obstacle in order to create more space for ourselves, rather than restricting ourselves within its boundaries? No matter whether the wall is forced outside or whether it needs to be pushed by artists ourselves, the performance presents this opposition, confrontation and struggle.

photo credit: Hua Jin

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